Amplitude / Articles / Health & Medicine / Limb-loss Community Mourns Loss of Amputee Yoga Pioneer Marsha Danzig

Limb-loss Community Mourns Loss of Amputee Yoga Pioneer Marsha Danzig

In Amplitude’s second issue back in the spring of 2015, Marsha Danzig wrote: “Yoga offers the best of what amputees want—physical freedom, a relaxed psyche, and a feeling of calm in the face of uncertainty.” Danzig shared those gifts with thousands of individuals over the course of her life. As the author of Yoga for Amputees and the world’s leading authority on the subject, she helped people discover physical and spiritual wholeness after limb loss. Her writings, videos, online classes, and in-person trainings showed the way to self-healing—not only for amputees, but also for people with other disabilities and people defined as able-bodied.

Danzig’s sudden death from COVID in mid-January came as a shock to all who knew her or were touched by her work. Days earlier, she’d seemed completely healthy (as usual) in mind, body, and spirit. She was fresh off a triumphant TedX talk/dance performance titled, “Flamenco Is My Flight.” Danzig’s year-old side business, Deep Into Your Soul, was picking up momentum. Her 2022 calendar was packed with events.

In the days following her passing, tributes poured in on Danzig’s Facebook page. “I am in disbelief and beyond heartbroken to learn of the passing of a dear friend, an amazing, gracious, and constant motivator and mentor to me,” wrote Aristotle Domingo, host of the AmpuTO Show podcast. “She showed me the way to yoga again and gave me confidence in the practice when I thought I’d never do yoga after experiencing limb loss. The world has lost one of its amazing people.”

Another former student described Danzig as “a ray of light in the amputee community and a beacon of hope. She radiated warm, gentle energy. The world seems dimmer.” A third said: “Her bright soul and passion for life welcomed others into the safety of love and healing work. She was a light like no other, full of goodness and grace and courage and humor.” And a fellow yoga instructor called Danzig “an amazing woman who survived childhood cancer, leg amputation, kidney failure, and a kidney transplant. She was one of the smartest, most caring and loving people I’ve ever known.” 

While Marsha Danzig will continue to nurture bodies and spirits through her books and videos, there’s no replacing her presence. The loss is a deep one. 

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