Tag: Spotlight on Books

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?Financial Toxicity? Can Lower Cancer Patients’ Quality of Life

Doctors who treat cancer are vigilant when it comes to the physical side effects of the therapies they prescribe, but financial stress from accumulating medical bills can also take a toll on patients’ health-even those who have finished their treatments and are cancer-free. The finding, published in the Journal of Oncology Practice, advances ongoing research...

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Silicon Prosthetic Skin Detects Pressure, Heat, Moisture

The prosthetic skin attached to a prosthetic hand. Photograph courtesy of Jaemin Kim, Seoul National University, Korea. Researchers in South Korea and the United States have developed an electronic prosthetic skin made with ultrathin, stretchable silicon that can mimic the capabilities of natural skin and may one day be used on prosthetic devices. Studied on...

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Higher-Earning Clinicians Make More Money by Ordering More Procedures Per Patient than by Seeing More Patients

In results characterized as “very surprising,” University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers found for the first time that higher-earning clinicians make more money by ordering more procedures and services per patient rather than by seeing more patients, which may not be in patients’ best interest. The research team from the UCLA Department of Urology...

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Engineer Applies Robot Control Theory to Improve Prosthetic Legs

A University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) professor applied robot control theory to enable powered lower-limb prostheses to dynamically respond to the user’s environment and help individuals with amputations walk. Research shows that users of the robotic leg could walk on a moving treadmill almost as fast as an able-bodied person. The paper is...

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Researchers Strive to Limit Errors in Powered Prostheses

Photograph courtesy of NC State University. Powered lower-limb prosthetic devices hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. New research examines exactly what happens when these technologies fail with the goal of developing a new generation of more robust powered prostheses....

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Diabetes in Midlife Linked to Significant Cognitive Decline 20 Years Later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH) research suggests. The researchers found that diabetes appears to age the mind roughly five years faster beyond the...

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Healthy for the Holidays: Tips for People with Diabetes

From Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day, the holidays can be fun and heartwarming. They can also be exhausting and stressful. Challenges of the season include high-fat, carb-loaded food, parties with alcohol, tempting desserts, and a schedule that keeps you too busy to fit in your normal fitness activities. This is even harder if you have...

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?Good Fat? Could Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

A special type of fat found in some people could be used to manage type 2 diabetes. Scientists from Monash University and Stockholm University have discovered that brown fat, nicknamed the “good fat” because it warms up the body in cold temperatures, burning up calories in the process, also “hoovers up” excess sugar. The findings,...

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?Smart? Bandage Helps Protect and Monitor Wounds

A team of researchers led by Conor L. Evans, PhD, assistant professor at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS), has created a paint-on, see-through, “smart” bandage that glows to indicate a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration. Because oxygen plays a critical role in healing, mapping these levels...

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Researchers Urge Earlier, More Aggressive Treatment for People with Prediabetes

Doctors at three leading research institutions and the American Diabetes Association report that treating patients with prediabetes as if they had diabetes could help prevent or delay the most severe complications associated with this chronic disease, which affects about 30 million people in the United States. Many amputees are at higher risk for the disease...

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Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Reaches One-Year+ Milestone

Ortiz Catalan (left) and Brånemark (right) with the first patient treated with the osseointegrated implant system for neural control. Photographs courtesy of Max Ortiz-Catalan et al., Science Translational Medicine, 2014. In January 2013, a gentleman from Sweden who had undergone a transhumeral amputation more than ten years prior, was the first person in the world...

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Tips for Dealing with the Healthcare System

As they approached their golden years, one problem Philip and Ruth Barash didn’t foresee was having to struggle through their country’s healthcare system. “Philip’s health problems began in 1988 and steadily continued until his death in 2012,” says Ruth Fenner Barash, who shares the couple’s harrowing healthcare experiences in her book, For Better or Worse:...

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Various Diets Help with Weight Loss?If You Stick to Them

Study Finds Little Difference in Effectiveness between Branded Diets Amputees who have an increased risk for weight gain because of a sedentary lifestyle might find some comfort in the results of a recent study of various branded or trademarked diets. According to the study, these diets have similar levels of effectiveness, and the key is...

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Uric Acid Might Be Factor in Development of Metabolic Syndrome

A new study suggests that uric acid may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes-diseases that many amputees are already at risk for because of a sedentary lifestyle. Uric acid is a normal waste product removed from the body by the kidneys and...

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Little Time for Exercise?

Running May Reduce Risk of Death for Amputees Regardless of Duration, Speed Running for only a few minutes a day or at slow speeds may significantly reduce a person’s risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to someone who does not run, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of...

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Amputee Coalition Announces 2014-2015 Skoski Scholarship Recipient

The Amputee Coalition announced that Ashby (AJ) Henningsen, 20, of Baltimore, Maryland, is the recipient of the $1,000 Christina Skoski, MD Scholarship for 2014-2015. Henningsen is a President’s List honors student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He was born with a congenital limb difference but has not let that deter him from pursuing...

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Report: Adults with Disabilities Continue to Be Economically Shortchanged

A new report from the National Disability Institute (NDI) shows that 24 years after the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law and guaranteed all individuals with disabilities the opportunity to achieve “economic self-sufficiency,” people with disabilities are less financially stable than people without disabilities. Based on data collected for a study...

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Medical Doctor Offers Advice on Achieving Successful Long-Term Weight Loss

Obesity expert Mohammad Emran, MD, has seen people try everything under the sun to lose weight. In his new book, Fast-Track Your Health-The Four Keys to Successful Weight Loss, he shares what he’s learned about what people need to do to achieve and maintain weight loss. “It all comes down to four things,” he says....

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People with a Disability More Likely to Be Obese, Have Chronic Illnesses

Adults with a disability are more likely to be obese or extremely obese than those without a disability, according to a study led by researchers at The University of Texas School of Public Health, which is part of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Approximately 54 million Americans live with a...

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Getting The Most Out Of Your Visit To The Doctor

“A good doctor-patient relationship is essential to achieving the best possible care, but the reality is, most doctors have less and less time to spend with each patient,” says Paul Griner, MD, professor of medicine emeritus at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and author of The Power of Patient Stories: Learning...

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New or Experienced Amputee: A Support Group Offers Many Benefits

Whether you are a new amputee or have been one for a long time, participating in an amputee support group can offer you many benefits. Amputee support groups can provide a network for locating healthcare providers, finding adaptive equipment, just meeting new friends, or perhaps sharing your knowledge with new amputees. Fortunately today, around the...

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Increasing Daily Coffee Consumption May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Posted June 24, 2014 People who increased the amount of coffee they drank each day by more than one cup over a four-year period had an 11 percent lower risk for type 2 diabetes than those who made no changes to their coffee consumption, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public...

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Is It Really Depression or Is It Diabetes Distress?

New Study Shows that People with Type 2 Diabetes Might Be Misdiagnosed for Depression Posted June 18, 2014 Researchers have long understood that there is a strong association between diabetes and depression. But new research presented at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions shows that symptoms of depression in people with type 2 diabetes...

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Amputee Golf Charities Accepting Scholarship Applications

Posted June 4, 2014 The nonprofit Amputee Golf Charities is currently accepting applications for the Henry Brown Memorial Educational Scholarship for the 2014-2015 academic year. Applications must be submitted by August 1 in order to receive maximum consideration. Amputee Golf Charities sponsors the annual Amputee Tournament Players Championship the first weekend in June in Shelbyville,...

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