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Pilot Study: Crossover Feet May Improve Mobility for Below-knee Amputees

A pilot study published May 19 in Prosthetics and Orthotics International compared
crossover feet and energy-storing feet on performance-based tests using
a range of low-level (e.g., sit-to-stand) and high-level (e.g., jogging)
activities. Study results suggested that while crossover feet may
improve low- and high-level mobility, intervention effects were small,
and practice effects were observed in all outcomes.

Seven participants who each had a below-knee amputation completed
a battery of performance-based outcome measures, including the
Five-Times Sit-to-Stand, Timed Up and Go, Four Square Step Test, and the
Comprehensive High-level Activity Mobility Predictor. Participants wore
duplicate prostheses fit with crossover feet and energy-storing feet to
perform the tests; the order of foot conditions was randomized. Paired t-tests
were used to evaluate differences between feet and order of testing.
Data from the participants showed improvements in all measures while
using crossover feet. Improvements in the second foot condition were
also observed, indicating a practice effect for all measures, the study
found. However, differences between feet and order of conditions were
not statistically significant.

Crossover
feet may improve below-knee prosthesis users’ performance compared to
energy-storing feet across a range of activities, but more research is
needed, the study found. Future research is also needed to evaluate the
influence of practice effects on performance-based mobility measures.
Practice effects may be an influential factor in the measurement of
performance-based mobility outcomes and should be considered when
performing a clinical assessment.

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